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Financial News UK: Assortment of belongings of NASA administrator sold at auction

NASA has announced an assortment of items from the estate of the late National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Administrator Thomas O. Paine, were auctioned on October 6 any Abell Auction Company, the company said.

Paine oversaw the US space program during the first manned missions to the moon.

Signed Apollo 11 memorabilia heads to live and online auction.

Named the third administrator of NASA by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1969, Paine served during the first seven Apollo missions in which 20 astronauts orbited the earth, 14 flew to the moon and four walked on its surface. An array of NASA memorabilia signed by Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins from his estate will be offered,

Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles´ original and premier auction house, has been entrusted with fine estates and collections for over a century. Now in its fourth generation of family operation, it has handled the treasured belongings of many high-profile clients and legendary figures in Hollywood.

View full article here: https://financial-news.co.uk/assortment-of-belongings-of-nasa-administrator-sold-at/

Spectrum News 1: Early NASA Space Exploration Memorabilia Up For Auction

COMMERCE, Calif. – Some historic NASA memorabilia is going to be sold on Sunday.

The Abell Auction Company is selling the estate of Doctor Thomas Paine. He oversaw the United States space program in the late 1960s. Under him the first seven Apollo manned missions were flown: 20 astronauts orbited the Earth, 14 went to the moon, and four walked on its surface.

The Abell Company has been in Todd Schireson’s family for several generations. Every week he is the auctioneer.

“I think the fun part is history. I think you have to have an appreciation for it and where things have come from,” said Schireson.

The auction is October 6, 2019 starting at 10 a.m.

View full article & video here: https://spectrumnews1.com/ca/la-west/news/2019/10/04/early-nasa-space-exploration-memorabilia-up-for-auction

Fine Books & Collections: Apollo 11 Memorabilia Heads to Auction on Oct. 6

Los Angeles — An exclusive assortment of items from the estate of the late National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Administrator Thomas O. Paine, who oversaw the U.S. space program during the first manned missions to the moon, will be auctioned on Oct. 6 by Abell Auction Company in Los Angeles. Live bids will be accepted online and at the gallery (2613 Yates Ave.) starting at 10 a.m. PST.
 
Named the third administrator of NASA by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1969, Paine served during the first seven Apollo missions in which 20 astronauts orbited the earth, 14 flew to the moon and four walked on its surface. An array of rare NASA memorabilia signed by Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins will be offered, including:

    •    Framed American flag with Apollo IX patch carried into space aboard Apollo IX spacecraft ($1,500-2,000)
    •    Framed photograph “Apollo 11 Spacewalk” with matting signed by Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins ( $1,000-1,500)
    •    Framed photograph “Man on the Moon” signed by Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins ($2,000-3,000)
    •    Framed photograph “The Moon” annotated and signed by Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong ($600-800)
    •    Framed photograph “Man’s First Foot Print on the Moon” signed by Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong
    •    “First Man on the Moon” stamp sheet signed by Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins ($2,000-3,000)
    •    Peanuts “Snoopy on the Moon” comic strip annotated and signed by Charles M. Schulz ($2,000-3,000)
    •    NASA Apollo 11 sterling trophy “Man on the Moon” dated July 1969, A.D. and inscribed with the names of President Richard M. Nixon and Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins ($1,000-1,500)

The Oct. 6 sale also will feature the estate of Mario Zamparelli, a marketing genius and designer who gained fame creating the corporate identity of Trans World Airlines for aviation billionaire Howard Hughes. Zamparelli developed iconic design identities for companies such as Capital Records, Universal Pictures, Nissan, Hunts Foods, Mattel and Suzuki. For those interested in his unique personal effects, featured items include a small Auguste Rodin bronze and period mid-century modern furniture by Finn Juhl, Hans Wegner, Florence Knoll, Eero Saarinen and many more.  
 
Abell is also pleased to offer a stunning collection of fine art, antique and contemporary furniture, 20th century design, jewelry and exotic sports cars from prominent Southern California estates. Vehicles include a 2017 Ferrari 488 Spider, 2017 Ferrari California T Handling Special and 2015 Bentley Flying Spur 12.
 
An auction preview will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. from Oct. 2 to 5 at the Abell gallery, 2613 Yates Ave., Los Angeles. Call 323.724.8102 for more information or visit www.abell.com to view a complete catalog.

View full article here: https://www.finebooksmagazine.com/news/apollo-11-memorabilia-heads-auction-oct-6

Antiques & The Arts Weekly: Exotic Sports Cars To Hit Auction Block October 6

LOS ANGELES — Abell Auction
Company will conduct a
fine art, antiques, Twentieth
Century design, jewelry and
vehicle auction on Sunday, October
6, beginning at 10 am.
The sale features property
from prominent southern California
estates and will be highlighted
by a collection of exotic
sports cars. Vehicles include a
2017 Ferrari 488 Spider, 2017
Ferrari California T Handling
Special and a 2015 Bentley Flying
Spur 12.
Abell represents the estate of
Dr Thomas O. Paine, who oversaw
the US space program during
the first manned missions to
the moon. Paine joined the space
agency as its deputy administrator
in January 1968 and was
named the third administrator
in its history in March 1969.
During his tenure, NASA
launched the first seven Apollo
missions, in which 20 astronauts
orbited the earth, 14 flew to the
moon and four walked on its surface.
The Paine estate includes
an array of NASA memorabilia,
a collection of Asian art and California
landscapes.
Fine art in the auction includes
paintings and drawings signed
Kathryn Andrews, Hans Burkhardt
(4), Mary Cassatt,
George Chan, Sandro Chia,
Rafael Coronel, Frank William
Cuprien, Edvin Earle, Emilio
Grau-Sala, Abel Grimmer, Andre
Hambourg, Ellsworth Kelly,
Richard Lorenz, Nathan Joseph
Roderick Oliveira, Peter Max,
Jozef Israels (2), Alec Monopoly
(3), Karel Ooms, Camille Pissarro,
Tony Rosenthal, Nikolai
Shabunin, Hanson Duvall
Puthuff, Robert Spencer (2)
Luciano Ventrone; sculpture
signed Albert Carrier-Belleuse,
Michel Claude Clodion, Stan
Johnson (2), Dave McGary (6),
Vasa Velizar Mihich, Auguste
Rodin, Peter Shire and Loet
Vanderveen (2).
Antique and contemporary furniture
includes a Louis XV-style
kingwood and ormolu-mounted
cylinder desk; Louis XV burl
walnut buffet a deux corps;
Louis XV-style ormolu-mounted
marquetry and parquetry tulipwood
writing cabinet; Louis XVstyle
kingwood and ormolu
mounted vitrine, stamped Linke;
Louis XVI-style ormolu-mounted
mahogany commode; Tiffany
& Co. gothic revival tall case
clock; two Finn Juhl lounge
chair models NV-45 and NV-53,
and a dining table with four
chairs; Eero Saarinen womb
chair and grasshopper chair;
pair of Le Corbusier chrome club
chairs; Hans Wegner “Sawbuck”
chair and four “Wishbone”
chairs; and Florence Knoll
chrome base table.
Modern and contemporary
prints and multiples include
works signed Fletcher Benton,
Bernard Buffet, Alexander
Calder, Salvador Dali (3), Sam
Francis, Guido Gambone, David
Hockney, Friedensreich Hundertwasser,
Robert Indiana (2),
Pablo Picasso (Madoura) (3),
Rufino Tamayo; and more.
Jewelry includes an emerald
cut diamond engagement ring
(4.04 carats); pair of diamond
studs (3.68 carats total); 14K
and diamond pendant necklace
(2.07 carats); Art Deco diamond
and platinum engagement ring
(1.64 carats); 18K white gold,
diamond and ruby necklace; 18K
white gold, diamond, and emerald
cocktail ring; 18K and diamond
Rolex Datejust; and
Lalaounis 18K olive leaf necklace.
The auction will also feature
the estate of Mario Zamparelli,
who had a distinguished career
both as an artist and corporate
marketing genius to many of
America’s largest companies.
Zamparelli is most recognized
for his title of chief executive
designer to aviation billionaire
Howard Hughes. For 18 years,
he created the corporate identity
of TWA and Hughes’ numerous
other aviation lines. Zamparelli
is responsible for many of the
iconic corporate design identities
such as Nissan, Capital
Records, Hunts Foods, Union
Bank, Universal Pictures,
Southern California Gas Company,
Kimberly Clark, Mattel,
Suzuki and The Norton Simon
Corporation.
Decorative arts in the sale feature
a Navajo chief’s blanket;
collection of Native American
woven baskets and ceramic pots;
six Laura Anderson ceramic vessels;
Chihuly nine-piece sculpture;
Christofle gilt bronze vase;
French dore-bronze and porcelain
three-piece clock garniture;
four Steinway & Sons grand
piano; pair of Austrian hammered
brass vases by Josef Hoffman;
large collection of antique
weaponry; pair of stone carved
sphinxes; and Tiffany & Co. sterling
footed bowl.
Asian art works of art include
an Eighteenth Century Chinese
imperial coat, Haniwa horse
head, signed Tibetan dragon
rug, Chinese famille rose porcelain
and gilt-turquoise ground
covered box, Chinese gilt-bronze
archaistic ritual bell, Chinese
celadon and blue-glazed vase,
Chinese gilt-bronze deity, Chinese
yellow porcelain vase, Chinese
sterling pitcher, Chinese
porcelain “butterfly” vase, Chinese
carved stone guan yin, Japanese
tiger textile, pair of Thai
sterling presentation boxes;
Korean brown and white glazed
ceramic jar, Eighteenth Century
Tibetan chest and Tibetan
thangka.
An auction preview will be conducted
October 2-5 from 9 am to
4 pm. The Abell gallery is at
2613 Yates Avenue. For more
information, 800-404-2235 or
www.abell.com.

New York Times: When the Antiques Have to Go With spare interiors and light colors all the rage right now, selling a home filled with period pieces can be a challenge.

The owners of the 2,000-square-foot loft in Chelsea loved antiques, and had furnished the apartment accordingly. There was a china cabinet topped with carved scrollwork and a grandfather clock standing sentry near the door. Persian rugs padded the floor.

And it was all getting in the way of a sale.

“It was filled very beautifully with antiques that were quite expensive and precious, but did not fit with what you consider a Chelsea loft,” said Charlie Miller, a Corcoran agent who represented the owners with his colleague Laurie Lewis. “It didn’t fit with the type of buyer who’d be looking at the space.”

The owners were resistant to removing the furniture, and the brokers weren’t happy with the initial level of interest in the condo. So they took photos of the rooms and used staging technology to give the apartment a different look. The first photo in the listing became a rendering of the living room, a grand space with a wall of windows. “We virtually emptied it, we whitewashed the walls. We put a modern sensibility in,” Ms. Lewis said. “It sold within a matter of weeks.”

At a time when home design television shows and shelter magazines emphasize light colors and pared-down interiors, it can be harder to sell homes that are furnished with antiques. Large pieces in particular can make a property feel smaller than it is or hide desirable features.

Deborah Ribner, a Warburg agent, recently represented a 2,800-square-foot apartment in Sutton Place that was part of an estate. The late owner had loved antiques: Sixteen chandeliers hung from the ceilings; the dining room table sat 12 and had a thronelike chair at one end. “The apartment had the most spectacular views from every single room,” Ms. Ribner said. “But it was so full that it was hard to appreciate them.” She helped the owner’s daughter clear out the antiques, and the co-op received multiple offers and was in contract within five weeks.

More significantly, in an age when so-called brown furniture is far out of favor, antiques can make a property feel dated and less appealing to buyers — especially younger ones. That can mean delicate conversations between antiques owners and real estate agents, who have to resort to explaining, cajoling, and creative solutions like virtual staging to make homes more marketable.

“If they’re a business person I tell them that what I’m selling is space,” said Robin Kencel, a broker with Compass in Greenwich, Conn. “If I’m working with a seller who is more emotional about their furnishings, I tread more gingerly. I’ll pull up photographs from magazines or Restoration Hardware, because that’s a common source if the buyer is between 35 and 45.”

Heirlooms, On the House

The problem is compounded by the fact that most antique furniture has dramatically dropped in value over the past couple of decades. Selling a 19th-century credenza you love for twice the original price is one thing; begging for offers on Craigslist quite another.

William and Mary-Claire Barton inherited some antique furniture from their families, and in the 1980s started collecting it as an investment. I convinced Bill,” said Ms. Barton, 70, formerly the owner and director of the Hoorn-Ashby Gallery in Nantucket and New York. “By the time we sell these things when we’re old, they’re going to have gone up so much in value. Guess what? They have not.”

That has presented a painful challenge as the couple downsizes from their three-bedroom apartment in the Musician’s Building at 50 West 67th Street to a smaller space nearby. “The fact that we’re getting pennies on the dollar when we go to sell them — that’s no fun,” said Mr. Barton, a Corcoran agent.

The couple called a well-known auction house to assess a George V game table and chairs they bought for $10,000 back in 2006. “He said, ‘I love this and everyone will love this.’” Ms. Barton said. But it would likely sell for only $1,200.

Their building dates to 1919, and the Bartons hoped that a buyer with a traditional bent might want to keep some of their furnishings. Several European shoppers did appreciate the décor, but it didn’t solve their problem: “We had three different viewers who had family antiques,” Ms. Barton said. “They needed ours to go so they could fit theirs.”

The Bartons’ children would like to take some pieces and they’ve reached out to estate buyers, but the prices they offered were too low to make selling worthwhile. They’ve even contacted the city to ask if they could donate furniture to homeless people getting back on their feet.

The Art of De-accessioning

“Brown doesn’t sell,” declared Amos Balaish, owner of New York Estate Buyers and Showplace Antique + Design Center in Chelsea. He added that there used to be a strong market for antiques “down South, but they’re not even buying it anymore. It’s sort of sad.”

He and his employees have a lot of difficult conversations with potential clients who are looking to sell their furnishings. Andrea Baker, manager of Showplace, said the rug market was down 90 percent.

“There’s the fashion element where things do cycle through periodically, but there’s another trajectory, which is life becoming increasingly less formal,” she said. “For the last 300 years it’s been in a downward trend.”

That doesn’t mean, though, that owners of antiques need to book a dumpster delivery. First, Dennis Harrington, head of Sotheby’s English and European Furniture Department in New York, said that the market for brown furniture seemed to have bottomed out. “It’s too early to talk about a comeback, but we’ve had a slight increase in interest over the last two years,” he said.

The first thing a seller should do is start weeding out antiques as soon as possible: “I would say as soon as you’re thinking about putting the property on the market, it’s not too soon,” Ms. Kencel said.

Decide what you want to part with, and find out which things relatives will take. She likes to use a sticker method, placing different colors on pieces that will be donated or sold. If the process is truly overwhelming, it can be worthwhile to bring in an organizer, decorator or appraiser who’s willing to be paid by the hour to assist.

If you suspect you might have something valuable, contact one of the top auction houses. “You shouldn’t be intimidated by the brand and the name,” Mr. Harrington said. If they’re not interested, they will refer you to other sources. If they are, they will ask for photographs and any paperwork you may have, to get a sense of the value of a piece. So will estate buyers, though Mr. Balaish said that wider shots of the home were more useful, because what you might consider most valuable might not actually be.

One recent client wanted to sell two 19th-century chairs that had originally cost her $12,000. “The current market for them is $1,000,” Mr. Balaish said. “But she had these plastic lamps that she bought for almost nothing. They’re midcentury — we can pay her more for that.”

Adam Blackman, co-owner of the Los Angeles furniture gallery Blackman Cruz, which deals in new and old furniture, points out that there are many regional and local auction houses that sell furnishings — and that sellers needn’t be discouraged if their belongings are rejected. “Go down the list,” he said. For 20th-century pieces he would contact Wright auctions in Chicago. Bonhams, which has offices in a number of U.S. cities, takes finer items. Abell Auction Company in Los Angeles is a good final stop, he said, with weekly auctions.

It helps to keep in mind what kinds of pieces are easier to sell. Smaller, more versatile items like side tables and compact desks are more likely to find a home, Ms. Baker said. Mr. Harrington said that the supply of antique dining tables far outstripped the demand, but that flip-up or expandable versions had some appeal — unlike big roll-top desks and slant-front cabinets.

“People don’t read or write the way they used to,” he said.

Living With Brown

Despite the popularity of Ikea and West Elm and the shuttering of antiques shops from New York to California, not everyone eschews older pieces. Nor should they.

“Charles and Ray Eames, they had stuff from their travels but they also had antiques,” said Mr. Blackman. “You want the layers, you want the depth, you want the contrast.”

When used thoughtfully, antiques can give a home more richness and comfort. After the interior designer Christina Murphy’s parents died a few years ago, she had to empty and sell their two traditionally furnished homes, one in Florida and another in Maine. She relied on an estate liquidator in Florida; the Maine house sold furnished, but the buyers let Ms. Murphy cherry-pick pieces to keep for her own home in Manhattan.

“I kept thinking to myself would I buy this if I saw it in an antiques store?” Ms. Murphy said. “If the answer was no, I didn’t keep it.”

She put a large round table with an elaborately carved base and gold leafing in her mostly white living room, an approach that Darryl Carter, who has an eponymous shop and interior decorating business in Washington, D.C., supports.

“The envelope is the critical thing,” he said. “Antiques can present as a very modern vernacular if they’re in a white space.”

Proportion is also important, according to Ms. Murphy. To keep a room feeling young and fresh, she advised keeping antiques to less than 25 percent of the furniture. “It definitely can’t start inching toward the 50,” she said. “But it’s so case by case. Art deco looks so modern. But one bad Victorian thing can ruin a whole view. Then you have to go to like 3 percent.”

Give a monumental piece plenty of breathing room, Mr. Carter said. And consider color carefully. Ebonized wood can look very modern, Ms. Murphy observed, and is easier to slot into a space. “When the browns go to a really reddy tone that gets a lot harder,” she said.

One solution: paint it. “Especially if we’re not dealing with the precious antiques, sometimes it can really be elevated with a coat of paint,” Mr. Carter said. “The other thing is, if you put white leather on an antique chair, suddenly it’s quite modern.”

Making It Ours Again

Kim Schmidt, an art dealer, and Andre Wlodar, vice-president of newsprint at Cellmark, have traveled extensively, gathering apothecary bottles, candelabra and centuries-old cherubim everywhere from Krakow to Guadalajara. The objets filled their apartment; they even had special lighting installed.

But when they decided to downsize from their Upper West Side three-bedroom a year ago, their agent, Ann Cutbill Lenane, of Douglas Elliman, was firm.

“The standard model they tell you — and they’re probably right — was we had to remove at least 25 to 30 percent of our personal furnishings,” Mr. Wlodar said. They removed books and edgier art, and made many trips to Housing Works. Ms. Lenane made them paint the walls white.

“That. Was. Hard,” Ms. Schmidt said. Added Mr. Wlodar: “From that moment, I started to feel like it was no longer our apartment, and that hurt.”

They moved into their new place in July. It’s smaller and more modern, with tons of light. The couple are happy with the change. “It’s a good thing to be thoughtful about your things,” Ms. Schmidt said. It helps that they have a house in upstate New York that they’re planning to expand.

“We are already figuring out where things are going to go,” Mr. Wlodar said.

View the full article here: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/24/realestate/when-the-antiques-have-to-go.html



Yoga Digest: SHOPPING ECO-FRIENDLY: WHAT’S OLD IS NEW

If you like to shop Eco-friendly, you may be overlooking one of the oldest sustainable shopping practices around!

Eco-consumerism is on the rise! According to a 2019 fashion resale report (thredUP), 74 percent of people aged 18-29 prefer buying from sustainably conscious brands and there are more secondhand shoppers than ever before. The thrill of the hunt for variety, sustainability and value transcends age and income, with millennials and baby boomers leading the way. In today’s luxury market, items from the past are fashion-forward.

Shop Green and Go Chic at Los Angeles’ Abell Auction Company!

As part of this trend, Abell Auction Company – L.A.’s original and 103-year-old auction house – empowers eco-conscious shoppers with a unique and diverse line of vintage luxury goods from premier Southern California estates. Out with the old, in with the new has lost its appeal. In with the old is the new trend for green shoppers choosing live auction over retail.

It’s Not His Grandfather’s Auction House Anymore

Todd Schireson, 37, is Vice President of Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles’ original and premier auction house. Family-operated for 103 years, it has handled the treasured belongings of many
high-profile estates and legendary figures in Hollywood.

Todd is especially passionate about creating an ideal space for green shoppers to find items they love and that match their lifestyle. He sometimes holds pop-up displays at Venice Beach, Calif. for millennials to preview hot auction items, including vintage fashion, jewelry, timepieces, furniture, artwork and design that you won’t find anywhere else! “We are providing the ultimate luxury recycling experience,” Todd said.

When he’s not at the auction block, Todd is responsible for daily operations. With a solid base in Southern California, they have expanded the business into areas such as Santa Barbara, San Diego, Palm Springs, Las Vegas and Northern California. Todd has also enhanced the company’s online presence to grow its international audience of buyers.

Whether it’s pulling out David Hockney lithographs from neglected basements in Los Angeles, or conducting charity auctions for Jane Goodall, it is the unexpected nature of the job that Todd finds most intriguing. Todd has discovered hidden treasures in abandoned estates, discussed business with Hollywood legends and appraised items for elected officials. “Every so often we come across really fun and interesting estates,” Todd said. “One sale that especially appealed to a young, hip audience featured more than 200 pairs of rare collectible men’s in-box sneakers.”

Todd grew up surrounded by antiques and fine art through the family business. He started taking an interest in design at a young age and knew that he wanted to work in the art world. After earning a bachelor’s degree in Business/Economics from the U.C. Santa Barbara, he worked in high-end residential management with some of the most important interior designers of the day, which grew his passion for art and design. With his grandfather and father running Abell Auction Company, he entered the family business during his mid-twenties.

Creating an Ecommerce Platform

Today, Abell Auction Company enjoys an influx of 800-1,200 items from up to a dozen Southern California estates at each weekly live auction. Abell is also famous for its high-end quarterly live and online auctions that attract a loyal following of clients – ranging from set decorators and production designers to interior decorators and private buyers. “Auctions showcase and keep in circulation unique items that can be reused rather than purchased new – conserving precious resources and reducing environmental impact,” Todd said. “What one person may discard can be highly valued by someone else. Plus, we offer consumers a fun and exciting shopping experience.”

Todd currently resides in Venice Beach, Calif., with his two young daughters. He spends his time appraising art for auction throughout the Los Angeles area, and hopefully getting to spend some time in the ocean on the weekends.

Auctions Matter to the Environment

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), only 15.3 percent of textiles – such as clothing, furniture, carpets, footwear and other nondurable goods – are recycled. By looking at a product’s entire life cycle, new opportunities to reduce environmental impacts, conserve resources and reduce costs can be discovered. Abell Auction Company helps recycle and keep in circulation an abundance of items that might otherwise go to a landfill.

Upcoming Auction Spotlight

Abell Auction Company will conduct a fine art, antiques, 20th century design, jewelry and vehicle auction on Sunday, Oct. 6.  Live bidding begins at 10 a.m. PST online and at the gallery (2613 Yates Ave., Los Angeles). The sale will feature the estates of Dr. Thomas O. Paine, who oversaw the nation’s space program during the first manned missions to the moon, and Mario Zamparelli, an artist and corporate marketing genius who gained fame as chief executive designer to aviation billionaire Howard Hughes. For additional information, call 800.404.2235 or visit www.abell.com.

View full article here: https://yogadigest.com/shopping-eco-friendly-whats-old-is-new/

Antiques & The Arts Weekly: Lincoln Beardless Portrait Campaign Flag Waves To $129,800 At Abell

LOS ANGELES — Abell Auction Company’s May 19 fine art, design and jewelry auction also featured a rare Abraham Lincoln 1860 campaign portrait flag with a picture of Lincoln as a young man without a beard and 13 stars (12 in a circle around a large centered star). The red, white and blue cotton flag banner, 18 by 26 inches, with the words “Lincoln & Hamlin” printed in capital letters across a white stripe, carried a $30/40,000 estimate. After intense bidding both online and in the gallery, the flag, which was in remarkably good condition, was won at $129,800 by a Western collector who wishes to remain anonymous. For more information, www.abell.com or 800-404-2235.

https://www.antiquesandthearts.com/lincoln-beardless-portrait-campaign-flag-waves-to-129800-at-abell/

Auction Central News: Abell Auction showcasing Francois Linke cabinetry May 19

Abell Auction showcasing Francois Linke cabinetry May 19

Yahoo Finance: Abell Auction Co. Presents Exquisite Array of Fine Art, Antiques, 20th Century Design and Jewelry from Prominent Estates on May 19 in Los Angeles

Abell Auction Co. will offer a stunning array of fine art, 20th century design, antiques and jewelry from prominent Southern California estates on Sunday, May 19 starting at 10 a.m. PST. Live bids can be placed online and at the gallery (2613 Yates Ave., Los Angeles).

The sale features a Regency style gilt-bronze mounted kingwood bureau plat and Louis XV style gilt-bronze mounted tulipwood and rosewood marquetry grand piano signed by Francois Linke, one of the most important French furniture makers of the 19th century. Highlighted auction items include:

Antiques
Erard Louis XV style gilt-bronze mounted marquetry grand piano, signed F. Linke
French ormolu-mounted parquetry inland commode, signed F. Linke
Regency style gilt-bronze mounted kingwood bureau plat, signed F. Linke
Collection of antique inkwells

Modern Furniture and Art
Pablo Picasso Feuille D’ Etudes “Profils De Marie-Therese Et Tete De Rembrandt Au Beret”
Dale Chihuly “Seaforms”
Tadao Ando ‘1515’ custom table
Swarovski crystal “Enlace” pendant lamp
Armani Casa Adelchi metal writing desk

Fine Art
William Ritschell “Primitive Life in the South Seas”
Alphonse Osbert “Le Matin Sur L’Etang
Antoni Kozakiewicz “Gypsy Family”
Drawing by Diego Riviera
Three paintings by Vu Cao Dam

Jewelry
Three diamond engagement rings (6.07, 6.47, and 6.59 carats)
Van Cleef & Arpels “Spirit of Beauty” brooch
Lady Rolex with diamond bezel
Collection of gold and diamond cigarette cases

An auction preview will be held May 15-18 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Abell gallery, 2613 Yates Ave., Los Angeles. Visit www.abell.com or call 800.404.2235.

About Abell Auction Company
Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles’ original and premier auction house, has been entrusted with fine estates and collections for over a century. It has handled the treasured belongings of many high-profile clients, including legendary figures in Hollywood. Now in its fourth generation of family operation, Abell’s weekly and quarterly sales attract an international audience of in-person and online buyers. For more information, visit www.abell.com or call 323.724.8102.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/abell-auction-co-presents-exquisite-170000598.html

Antiques & The Arts Weekly: Abell To Sell Iconic Piece Of American History May 19

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EYE ON L.A. All-access pass: Behind the scenes at some of L.A.’s favorite places

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Auction Central News: Abell Auction To Sell Estates Of Game Show Host, Resistance Leader Feb. 24

Paul Augustin Aizpiri, ‘French Riviera,’ oil on canvas, signed lower right, 23¾ x 30 inches, framed. Estimate: $5,000-$7,000. Abell Auction Co. image

LOS ANGELES – Abell Auction Co. will offer a stunning array of fine art, antiques, 20th-century design and jewelry from prominent Southern California estates on Sunday, Feb. 24. Live bidding begins at 10 a.m. Pacific time online and at the gallery, 2613 Yates Ave. Absentee and Internet live bidding is available through LiveAuctioneers.

The sale features an impressive collection of mid-century furniture from the estate of Ann and Bill Cullen (1920-1990), a famed American radio and television personality who hosted more than 25 game shows in a career spanning over five decades. From 1956 to 1966, he hosted the initial daytime and primetime versions of The Price Is Right. He was also a panelist on I’ve Got a Secret and To Tell the Truth, where he also guest hosted on occasion. Throughout his entire career in radio and television, Cullen hosted more than 25,000 individual episodes of radio and television shows.

Pablo Picasso, Madoura pottery ‘Tetes’ pitcher, 5¼ inches high. Estimate: $4,000-$6,000, 5¼ inches high. Estimate: $4,000-$6,000. Abell Auction Co. image

Abell is also honored to present antique German carved wood armoires, coffers and credenzas from the estate of prominent Santa Barbara humanitarians Dr. Christel Bejenke Wittenstein and Dr. George (Jürgen) Wittenstein, who was a leader of the German “White Rose” Nazi resistance group and one of its only members to survive the Holocaust.

The exclusive assortment of auction items includes:

– Fine art by Paul Augustin Aizpiri, Phil Dyke, Peter Max, Ed Moses (2), Jean Lambert-Rucki and Theo Tobiasse.

– Modern and contemporary prints and multiples by George Braque, Leonora Carrington (2), Marc Chagall (5), David Hockney (2), Ellsworth Kelly, Joan Miro (2), Robert Motherwell (2), Pablo Picasso (2), Richard Serra, Rufino Tamayo and Andy Warhol (below).

Andy Warhol, ‘Northwest Coast Mask,’ from ‘Cowboys & Indians,’ circa 1986, F.& S., 380 colored screenprint on museum board signed and numbered 236/250 lower right, 36 x 36 inches, frame measures 37 x 37 inches. Estimate: $15,000-$20,000. Abell Auction Co. image

– Jewelry: an 18K emerald and diamond ring (below); an 18K yellow, white gold, platinum and diamond ring (7.08 carats); a Van Cleef & Arpels 18K gold, coral and chrysoprase Maltese cross brooch; a Tiffany & Co. yellow, white gold, diamond and coral flower brooch; a Zolotas 18K white, yellow gold diamond, ruby and cultured pearl suite; and a Cartier 18K gold, diamond and jadeite ring, and pair of gold hoop earrings.

18K white gold, emerald (6.29 carats) and diamond ring. Estimate: $40,000-$50,000. Abell Auction Co. image

– Antiques: A French ormolu-mounted mahogany commode à vantaux signed Linke (below), French ormolu-mounted parquetry inlaid and marble top commode signed Linke, a pair of Louis XVI ormolu mounted and marble top tables, four Louis XVI open armchairs signed Jacob Paris, and a pair of French Regence gilt wood mirrors.

French ormolu-mounted commode à vantaux signed Linke, 63 inches wide, 24 inches deep, 39½ inches high. Estimate: $20,000-$30,000. Abell Auction Co. image

For details contact Abell Auction Co. at call 800-404-2235.

View full article here.

Antiques & The Arts Weekly: Abell To Present Collection Of Fine Art & Antiques On Feb. 24

LOS ANGELES — Abell Auction
Company will conduct a
fine art, antiques, Twentieth
Century design and jewelry auction
on Sunday, February 24. Continue reading

360 Magazine: Q&A With Todd Schireson, Abell Auction Co.

Vice President of Abell Auction Company, Todd Schireson, gives a one-on-one personal interview regarding his business as well as his family’s legacy. Continue reading

Antiques & The Arts Weekly: Southern California Estates Seed Abell’s September 16 Sale

  LOS ANGELES — Abell Auction
Company will conduct a
fine art, antiques, Twentieth
Century design and classic
vehicle auction on Sunday,
September 16. Live bidding
begins at 10 am online and at
the gallery.

This sale features property
from prominent Southern California
estates and will be highlighting
a collection of vehicles,
including a 1930 Chevy coupe,
1941 Cadillac Series 62 convertible
coupe, 1983 Rolls
Royce Silver Spur sedan and a
2008 Bentley Continental GT
convertible.
The auction also features
paintings and drawings signed
or attributed to Antoine
Blanchard, Rosa Bonheur,
Benjamin C. Brown, David
Burliuk, Lilia Carrillo,
Edouard Cortes, Montague
Dawson, Suzanne Eisendieck,
Peter Ellenshaw, Angel Espoy,
Riccardo Tommasi Ferroni,
Emilio Grau-Sala, Andre Hambourg,
Michele Loffredo, Peter
Max, Roger Muhl, Granville
Redmond, Claude Venard and
Czeslaw Wasilewski.
Antiques in this sale are
highlighted by a Louis XVstyle
gilt bronze commode à
vantaux, a French ormolumounted
bracket clock, a
French onyx and champlevé
center table, a French gilt
bronze and marble top guiredon,
a German inlaid chest of
drawers and a George II chinoiserie
tall case clock.
Modern furniture in the sale
includes a Frank Gehry “Easy
Edges” cardboard desk, a John
Gillon rope and rosewood chair
and ottoman, a Finn Juhl for
Baker dining set, a Lalique
glass panel inset game table
and a Raymond Lowry DF
2000 bedroom suite.
Prints and multiples feature
pieces signed Yaacov Agam,
Carlos Almaraz, Marc Chagall,
Jules Cheret, Christo, Antoni
Clave, Erte, Ellsworth Kelly,
Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein,
Federica Matta, Alphonse
Mucha, Frank Romero and
Julian Schnabel.
Jewelry features a Van Cleef
& Arpels 18K and diamond
“Spirit of Beauty” pin, a pair of
diamond ear studs, a Rolex
Submariner watch, a Breitling
watch, two 1.8-carat diamond
rings and a 14-carat diamond
and gold necklace and bracelet
suite.
Decorative arts include a Tiffany
Studios “Dogwood” chandelier,
a Tiffany Studios Greek
Key table lamp, a Tiffany Studios
Tree Trunk table lamp
base, a LeCoultre Atmos Millénaire
Marqueterie Auror clock,
a pair of Viennese silver an d
enamel covered vases, a Jeff
Koons Puppy vase and glassware
signed Dale Chihuly.
An auction preview will be
conducted September 12–15
from 9 am to 4 pm.
The Abell gallery is at 2613
Yates Avenue. For additional
information, 800-404-2235 or
www.abell.com.

360 Magazine: Millennials at L.A.’s Auction House

Whether they’re decorating their first apartment, cultivating a taste for modern art and design, or want to own something vintage, millennials are buying at auction to express themselves and live green!  Continue reading

Taiwan News: Abell Auction Company Hosts Fine Art, Antique, 20th Century Design and Classic Car Auction on May 20 in Los Angeles

 

LOS ANGELES–May 17, 2018–Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles’ original and 101-year-old auction house, will host its next quarterly sale on Sunday, May 20, featuring a stunning array of modern art and furnishings, 20 th and 21 st Century design, antiques and classic cars from prominent Southern California estates.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180517005154/en/

This Vasa nest of six hexagonal colored acrylic tables and column, and Tom Wesselmann print “Lulu” will be among the items auctioned by Abell on Sunday, May 20 at its L.A. gallery. (Photo: Business Wire)

Whether you’re decorating your home, satisfying your appetite for modern art and design, or searching for the classic car of your dreams, the auction offers something for both serious collectors and emerging buyers! Live bidding begins at 10 a.m. online and at the gallery (2613 Yates Ave in Los Angeles).

Auction highlights

-Pair of Chinese gilt bronze mounted jars -French Louis XV/XVI transitional green painted commode -Chinese hardwood what-not shelf, terracotta figure, and assorted porcelains and jades -Henry Moore “King & Queen” bronze -Francisco Zuniga “Bronze of Woman Kneeling” -Italian Neoclassical painted wood and marble top console -Jules Cavailles “Fleurs a Fruit” painting -Vasa nest of six hexagonal colored acrylic tables and column -Tom Wesselmann “Lulu” print

The auction also will feature Abell’s largest collection of vehicles from private collectors ever offered at a single sale, ranging from the rare 1915 Ford Model T roadster to the coveted 1965 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray.

Classic cars

– 1915 Ford Model T roadster -1926 Ford Model T touring car -1931 Austin American -1965 Chevrolet Corvette -1967 Chevrolet Malibu Sport Coupe -1967 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu SS convertible (2) -1967 Chevrolet Camaro convertible -1967 Chevrolet C-10 pickup truck -1967 Chevrolet El Camino (2) -2010 Mercedes CL63 AMG

Bidders are invited to preview auction items at the Los Angeles gallery from Wednesday, May 16 to Saturday, May 19 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit www.abell.com for a catalog or call 323.724.8102 for more information.

Abell Auction At-A-Glance

Date/time: Sunday, May 20, at 10 a.m. PDT (bid live at the gallery or online) Location: 2613 Yates Ave., Los Angeles, 90040 Gallery preview: May 16-19, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. PDT For more information: www.abell.com or 323.724.8102

Connect With Us

@abellauctionco for Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook and Twitter

 

Click here to see the whole article.

Antiques & The Arts Weekly: Classic Cars, Fine Art & Antiques At Abell Auction May 20

 

LOS ANGELES — Abell Auction Company will conduct a fine art, antiques, Twentieth Century design and classic vehicle auction on Sunday, May 20. Live online bidding begins at 10 am and at the gallery. This sale features property from prominent Southern California estates, and will be highlighted by a large collection of classic cars, including a 1965 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray, a 1967 Chevrolet Malibu Sport Coupe, two 1967 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu SS convertibles and a 1931 Austin American. Fine antiques in Abell’s sale are highlighted by a pair of mirrored Venetian consoles and mirrors, a pair of French Regence-style giltwood mirrors, a French Regence threedrawer marble top commode and a French Louis XV/XVI transitional green painted commode. Sculptures in the upcoming fine art auction include works signed Edward Berge, Felipe Castaneda, Henry Moore, Edith Barretto Parsons, Maurice Prost, Emile Arthur SoldiColbert, Bruno Zach and Francisco Zuniga. Steinway & Sons pianos will also be offered on May 20, including an antique cream painted and giltwood case grand piano and three ebony case grand pianos. The auction also features paintings and drawings signed or attributed to Ramiro Arrue (2), Duilio Barnabé (2), Jules Cavaillès (2), Michel Delacroix, Peter Ellenshaw, Ettore Forti, Jean-Richard Goubie, Ali Hassan, Charlotte Hublier, George Inness, William Keith, Thomas Kinkade (2), Sir Edwin Henry Landseer, JeanMarc Nattier, Saul Steinberg (3), Theo Tobiasse (2) and Robert Wood (2). Modern appointments include a Vasa colored acrylic column and nest of six hexagonal tables, a de Sede leather nonstop sectional sofa and prints and multiples by Francis Bacon, Martha Boto, Marc Chagall, Jim Dine, Joan Miro, Joan Mitchell, Alphonse Mucha (2), Pablo Picasso, Rufino Tamayo and Tom Wesselmann. An auction preview will be held May 16–19 from 9 am to 4 pm at the Abell gallery, 2613 Yates Avenue. For more information, www.abell.com or 800404-2235.

The Hollywood Reporter: Pieces From Melissa and Joan Rivers’ Private Homes Go to Auction

Here’s your chance to get your hands on a piece (or two) of Hollywood history. Items from the various residences of Melissa Rivers and her late mother Joan Rivers will be up for auction on Thursday, with prices ranging from $100 to $1,000. Highlighted pieces from the sale include a pair of French pink upholstered open armchairs, an ebony marble top and inlaid secretaire a abattant, a black lacquered leather top writing table, an elegant marble top server, an elephant garden seat and many more items. The auction, which is being put on by Abell Auctions, will begin at noon in Los Angeles. View full article by clicking here.

Antiques & The Arts Weekly: Abell Auction Company Gets Good Money For Hosmer ‘Faun’

Auction Action In Los Angeles Continue reading

BLOUIN ARTINFO: Auction Preview—Quarterly Auction at Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles, Feb 11

BY BLOUIN ARTINFO | FEBRUARY 07, 2018 Continue reading

Los Angeles Business Journal: Abell Auction Company Hosts Fine Art, Jewelry and Antique Auction on Feb. 11 in Los Angeles

Delight your Valentine! Sale offers timeless collection of fine estate jewelry, art, furnishings, 20th Century design and luxury accessories for both serious collectors and sophisticated buyers.

LOS ANGELES–(BUSINESS WIRE)

Abell Auction Company will conduct a fine art, antique and jewelry auction on Sunday, Feb. 11, featuring items from the estate of prominent Los Angeles activists Stanley and Betty Warner Sheinbaum, whose art-filled home was frequented by luminaries such as Barbra Streisand, Norman Lear, Edward Kennedy, and Bill and Hillary Clinton. Live bidding begins at 10 a.m. online and at the gallery, located at 2613 Yates Ave in Los Angeles.

Abell Auction Company's Feb. 11 fine art, jewelry and antique sale will feature items from the estat ... Abell Auction Company’s Feb. 11 fine art, jewelry and antique sale will feature items from the estate of prominent L.A. activists Stanley and Betty Warner Sheinbaum, who was the daughter of Warner Bros. studio executive Henry Warner (Photo: Business Wire)

Betty Warner Sheinbaum was the daughter of studio executive Henry Warner, one of the founders of Warner Bros. and a major contributor to the film industry. A prolific artist in her own right, she exhibited at multiple galleries throughout her lifetime and befriended many of the artists whose works she collected. Highlights of the Sheinbaum collection include an Arthur Espenet Carpenter desk and return, and fine art by Edmondo Bacci, Pu Ru, Russell Cowles, Ynez Johnston, Mario Prassinos and Dennis Eugene Norman Burton.

Abell will also offer a stunning array of modern and contemporary prints, decorative art, fine jewelry, silver appointments, Asian works of art, pianos, clocks and bronzes. Auction highlights include:

-Lithographs by modern and contemporary artists such as Pablo Picasso, David Hockney, Marc Chagall and Joan Miro
-Large round malachite salon table
-Pair of Maison Boudet French gilt bronze and marble five-light candelabra
-Georg Jensen “Acorn” and “Parallel” flatware services
-Raymond Yard diamond, platinum and cat’s eye chrysoberyl brooch
-Tiffany & Co. star sapphire, diamond and platinum ring
-5.44 carat oval ruby ring surrounded by marquise diamonds
-Round, brilliant cut 7.18 carat diamond engagement ring

An auction preview will be held Feb. 7-10, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Abell gallery. Visit www.abell.com to view a complete catalogue or call 323.724.8102 for more information.

Abell Auction At-A-Glance
Date/time: Sunday, Feb. 11 at 10 a.m. PST (bid live at the gallery or online)
Location: 2613 Yates Ave., Los Angeles, 90040
Gallery preview: Feb. 7-10, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. PST
For more information: www.abell.com or 323.724.8102

View complete article here.

Barnebys: Abell Auction will host a fine art, jewelry and antique auction, February 11th in Los Angeles

Featuring items from the estate of prominent Los Angeles activists Stanley and Betty Warner Sheinbaum. Continue reading

Antiques & The Arts Weekly: Activist Couple’s Estate Headlines Abell Auction On February 11

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. —
Abell Auction Company will conduct a fine art, antiques and jewelry auction on Sunday, February 11. Continue reading

Voyage LA: Meet Todd Schireson of Abell Auction Company

Today we’d like to introduce you to Todd Schireson.

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HuffPost: Moving a Home After the Loss of a Parent

“Our partner, Abell Auction, personally guides clients through the entire process of selling valuable belongings.”

 

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Antiques & The Arts Weekly: LaVerne Nelson Black Painting Doubles Estimate At Abell

The October 15, 2017 sale saw many notable prices. Continue reading

The Bee: Abell Auction To Conduct Fine Art, Antiques & Jewelry Auction October 15

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. — Abell Auction Co. will conduct a fine art, antiques and jewelry auction beginning at 10 am on October 15.

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Barnebys: Abell Auction will host a fine art, jewelry and antique auction, October 15th in Los Angeles

Pair of major collections will headline Abell Auction’s next big sale, Oct. 15th

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KNBC Los Angeles: Huge Collectible Sneaker Sale Today

More than 200 pairs of limited edition and deadstock sneakers hit the auction block today at Abell Auction Company.

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Street Insider: Get Your Kicks at Abell Auction

More than 200 pairs of deadstock, limited-edition and collaboration sneakers will be sold at live auction.

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Los Angeles Magazine—This Crazy Sneaker Collection Is About to Hit the Auction Block

KNBC Los Angeles: Abell Auction House Recalls Devastation of LA Riots

By John Cádiz Klemack

 

An auction house was lost in the chaos of the Los Angeles riots when it went up in flames. But today it’s back and thriving. John Cadiz Klemack reports for the NBC4 News on Friday, April 28, 2017.

The Jewelry Loupe: Red carpet accessories on the block in L.A. Oscar Sunday

L.A. Times: Auctioning off the late author Gore Vidal’s Hollywood Hills estate

Auctioning off the late author Gore Vidal’s Hollywood Hills estate

There was intense curiosity in literary and design circles alike when the Outpost Estates villa of noted author Gore Vidal hit the market last year in the Hollywood Hills, following his death in 2012.

For Vidal was not just a prolific writer but an avid collector.

On Sunday, hundreds of items from Vidal’s estate will be auctioned at Abell Auction Co. including artworks, furnishings and his personal library.

Items will range in price from about $400 to $12,000 and will include a Regency giltwood bull’s-eye mirror, a pair of Italian Baroque painted and parcel gilt torchieres, a Victorian walnut partner’s desk, a collection of Old Master paintings and drawings, as well as ceramic vessels by noted artists Harrison McIntosh and Beatrice Wood.

A preview will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. from Sept. 14 to 17 at the Abell gallery, 2613 Yates Ave., Los Angeles. The live and online sale will start at 10 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 18.  For more information, call (323) 724-8102 or visit www.abell.com, where a complete catalog will be posted.

lisa.boone@latimes.com

Beverly Hills News – Items from the Estate of Gore Vidal to be Auctioned

vidal

Posted: Tuesday, September 6, 2016 – 9:24 PM

(CNS) – Hundreds of items from the estate of Gore Vidal, including selections from the late author’s personal library and art and antiques from his homes, will be auctioned on Sept. 18 in Los Angeles, it was announced today.

Vidal died in 2012 at age 86. Among his most famous works are “Lincoln,” “Myra Breckinridge” and “The City and the Pillar.” A member of an illustrious political family, he was the grandson of a U.S. senator and twice ran unsuccessfully for public office.

The sale will feature items ranging in value from about $400 to $10,000 from the former residences of Vidal and his partner Howard Austen — a villa called “La Rondinaia” in the resort town of Ravello, Italy, and a Mediterranean style estate in the Hollywood Hills, according to Abell Auction Co.

Both properties were featured in design magazines such as Architectural Digest and also frequented by Broadway and Hollywood writers and actors, literary figures and politicians.

Featured items include an Italian Baroque giltwood and marble console; a porphyry marble table top; a Flemish Verdure tapestry; a pair of Italian Baroque painted and parcel gilt torchieres; an Italian walnut commode and secretaire; a Victorian walnut partner’s desk; a set of four Italian painted overdoors; a collection of Old Master paintings and drawings; a Roman marble funerary urn; and Asian artifacts.

For those interested in Vidal’s personal effects and memorabilia, items include his personal library of first edition works under his name and pseudonyms; awards and recognitions, including his “Ordre des Arts et des Lettres” medallion for contributions to the arts in France; and a typed note from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Tennessee Williams.

An auction preview will be held Sept. 14-17 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Abell gallery, 2613 Yates Ave., Los Angeles. The sale begins the following day at 10 a.m. PST.

Visit www.abell.com to view a complete catalogue of the auction items.

L.A. Times: The Abell auction house has been in the business of buying, selling and bargains for 100 years

A woman bids at Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles' oldest auction house, on Feb. 4, 2016. (Barbara Davidson / Los Angeles Times)

A woman bids at Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles’ oldest auction house, on Feb. 4, 2016. (Barbara Davidson / Los Angeles Times)

 

By Susan King (contact reporter)

The Abell Auction Co. not only has sold the estates of many Hollywood stars, its auctions attracted many a legend.

“Lucille Ball used to sit in the front row at our Sunday sales,” noted Abell CEO Don Schireson, who began working at the auction house with his father in 1977. “Julie Christie used to come, Buddy Hackett. Phil Everly came in — he used to buy rugs.”

Leslie Caron also frequented the auctions. “I was so infatuated with her when she would walk in, I would, like, bump into posts,” joked Abell’s executive vice president, Howard Zellman, who has also worked at Abell’s since the 1970s.

But these days, Zellman said, celebrities rarely frequent the weekly Thursday and quarterly Sunday auctions; they’re not as involved as past generations were in picking out their decor. As Zellman points out, today “celebrities buy what the decorators want them to buy.”

The auction house was founded in 1916 by Russian immigrant Abraham N. Abell in the West Adams area near Western Boulevard. But one entire building — complete with historical records — went up in flames during the 1992 riots. The Abell family owned a building in Commerce and moved in three weeks later.

Among the items the auction house has sold over the years include:

  • Loretta Young’s Palms Spring estate featuring personal and studio stills as well as correspondence.
  • The Laughlin Park Estate of Cecil B. DeMille, which featured museum quality Italian Renaissance furniture and rare books.
    Behind-the-scenes Classic Hollywood

Take a look on set during the making of classic movies and TV shows.

  • The furnishings of Barbara Stanwyck’s estate.
  • The Steinway grand piano Gene Autry used when composing “Here Comes Santa Claus.”
  • A Yamaha grand piano owned by Gene Kelly.

“We have had a lot of estates over the years of major and minor stars,” Zellman said. “I think the major reason we get them is that we are very discreet. Not everyone wants it plastered all over that this was their linen hamper.”

On a recent hot morning, workers were loading furniture and other items that had just been purchased into cars, trucks and SUVs. And inside, the weekly Thursday auction was in full swing with a nice crowd sitting in folding chairs bidding on items while other regulars perused the sofas, pottery, dishes, jewelry, tables, art work and even a Steinway piano that were being sold that day.

“We sell about 900 to 1,000 pieces each week,” Schireson said.

Most of the buyers come to the auction house in Commerce every Thursday to buy items for resale, EBay or to use in staging homes and condos that are for sale.

“There is one guy who is here every week and buys for someone in Pennsylvania,” Schireson said.

Abell’s quarterly auction is on Sunday and highlights items from the estates of Oscar-winning actor David Niven and Emmy Award-winning Sam Simon, the writer-producer-director and co-creator of “The Simpsons.” Simon, a prominent animal rights activist, died last year at age 59. Proceeds from auction will go to the Sam Simon Charitable Giving Foundation.

“The items in the weekly auction appeal to people who come in week in and week out,” Schireson said. “We have things here that might appeal to someone in France and someone in China or someone in New York.”

Interested parties can also bid online.

“There’s a different mindset back East,” Schireson noted. “People can sell things back East we can’t sell here. We can sell midcentury modern and contemporary here, but a lot of antiques sell better in New York and Europe.”

————

Select items from the Sam Simon estate and their estimated worth:

  • Dale Chihuly blown glass chandelier — estimate: $100,000-$150,000
  • Auguste Rodin: “Le Grand Penseur” — estimate: $80,000-$100,000
  • Cecil Beaton photograph: “Untitled” — estimate: $1,000-$1,5000
  • “Revelations (from End Times)” — estimate: $3,000-$4,000

 

 

Los Angeles Business Journal: Auction Firm Still Bidding For Business

Family-run Abell looks back on lots of history in 100-year existence.

By Olga Grigoryants
Monday, February 8, 2016

After paying $100,000 for a painting, a customer at Abell Auction Co. was too cheap to pay the delivery fee and drove off toward the freeway with the valuable piece strapped to his car roof.

Luckily he and his purchase got home safely. But it still provided one of many memorable incidents experienced over the years by the family-operated business in Commerce, which will mark its 100th anniversary this month.

The auction house has become a local landmark – going and going and not gone –while winning a customer base by selling eclectic antiques and classic Hollywood memorabilia along with elegant furniture and fine art.

“Everything they have is beautiful and you can always find something irresistible,” said longtime customer Delio Moreno, 83, who has filled his West Covina home with more than a thousand items from Abell.

Founded in 1916 by Russian emigrant Abraham Abell, it is now run by the founder’s nephew, Don Schireson.

“We’re the old school of business,” Schireson said. “We know our customers by name and we treat people right.”

In the coming days, he will be treating family, friends, staff and clients to a small but heartfelt anniversary celebration.

“We’re not going to do any big dinner with huge fanfare, just a quiet breakfast together,” said Schireson, whose auction house has also had other things to celebrate recently – including selling a$1 million collection of fine jewelry.

Joining the anniversary party will be the longest serving of the company’s more than 20 employees, Ruth Weinberg. She joined in 1943 as a secretary and now, at 93, still goes into the office once a week to answer phones and talk with bidders.

Deadline Hollywood: Sam Simon’s Emmys Hitting Auction Block For Charity

The live and online auction is set for February 21, 2016 at Abell Auction Company’s Los Angeles gallery. Continue reading

Ranch & Coast: Abell Auction Company

Everyone knows estate sales are one of the surest ways to score exceptional items. That’s especially true with Los Angeles-based auctioneers Abell, who have handled covetable belongings from the likes of a former U.S. president and Hollywood celebrities.  “Abell is a treasure trove for Southern California’s top decorators, designers, collectors and small dealers,” says Abell Auction Company CEO Don Schireson. “We present our clients with a constant influx of fine and decorative art, modern and antique furnishings, fine jewelry, and 20th century design.” Abell, which has a staff that includes translators for the growing Asian market, features furniture by famous designers like Paul Evans, Paul McCobb, Charles Eames, Walter Lamb, and Finn Juhl. One recent standout item was a Philip and Kelvin LaVerne cabinet that sold for $35,000. Abell’s February auction will showcase a wall installation by iconic glass artist Dale Chihuly. (323.724.8102)

By AnnaMaria Stephens

Jewish Journal: Auction house employee is going … going … not gone

Ruth Weinberg got a secretarial job at the Abell Auction Co. in 1943. Seventy-two years later, she still goes into the office every Thursday to answer phones, work on the computer and talk to bidders from that day’s auction.

Continue reading

Life After 50: Parting With Possessions – Prudently And Professionally

Special to Life After 50
by Joe Baratta of Abell Auction Company

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Modern Luxury Angeleno: Get to Know Our City’s Top Influencers

ANGE September 2015 p57

Beverly Hills Courier: David Webb Jewelry Auction Preview

BHCourier2015aug21 BHCourier2015aug21

Westside Today: At 93, Cheviot Hills resident revels in 72 years of working

Westside Today By Mariella Rudi

Ruth Weinberg, 93, has worked at the Abell Auction Company since 1943. She continues to drive to and from work.

Ruth Weinberg, 93, has worked at the Abell Auction Company since 1943. She continues to drive to and from work.

Century City’s southside neighbor, Cheviot Hills, has had many high-profile residents roll through its affluent foothills. From Lucille Ball to Ray Bradbury to Travis Barker, the Westside neighborhood is currently enjoying a revival as one of the hottest real estate enclaves this year. But the woman who has seen the area through all its iterations isn’t a household name, and she’s worked a lifetime to stay cozy in her home in Cheviot Hills, a neighborhood of approximately 1,400 single-family homes, most of which were built in the 1940s and early 1950s and are largely traditional in style. “It’s a wonderful area to be in, so convenient and close to everything,” said 93-year-old Ruth Weinberg and longtime Cheviot Hills resident. Proximity is especially important for Weinberg – she drives to and from work still. With National Senior Citizens Day arriving Aug. 21, Weinberg celebrates her 72nd year as an employee of Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles’ first auction house showcasing fine estate property. “I enjoy what I do. To me, it’s a day of feeling happy,” Weinberg said. The native Angeleno joined Abell in 1943, only taking breaks to get married and have children, and in later years to care for her ill husband. But she always found her way back to the company where “it was like a birthday party every time a lot came in. I opened things that I would never see unless I went to a museum. It’s like that even today.” Ruth still works every weekly auction (held on Thursdays) and every quarterly fine art and antique sale conducted by Abell, now in its fourth generation of family operation. She also volunteers regularly at Skirball Cultural Center. A civic-minded woman, Weinberg is active in any community she enters. When she moved to Cheviot Hills 50 years ago, L.A. was in the process of building itself; the Santa Monica freeway and Westside’s first, large public park, Cheviot Hills Park, were both new, and the Santa Monica Air Line of the Pacific Electric Railway was just discontinued. Weinberg and her husband moved there for its good schools and central location. There they raised three children in a two-story home. She remembers eating at John O’Groats on Pico Blvd. Her daughter is still close with friends who lived on the block. In her spare time, she rests, as one would suspect. She keeps busy with managing her own finances and her house, with no plans of retiring anytime soon.

Century City News: At 93, Cheviot Hills resident revels in 72 years of working

Century City News

Ruth Weinberg, 93, has worked at the Abell Auction Company since 1943. She continues to drive to and from work.

Ruth Weinberg, 93, has worked at the Abell Auction Company since 1943. She continues to drive to and from work.

Century City’s southside neighbor, Cheviot Hills, has had many high-profile residents roll through its affluent foothills. From Lucille Ball to Ray Bradbury to Travis Barker, the Westside neighborhood is currently enjoying a revival as one of the hottest real estate enclaves this year. But the woman who has seen the area through all its iterations isn’t a household name, and she’s worked a lifetime to stay cozy in her home in Cheviot Hills, a neighborhood of approximately 1,400 single-family homes, most of which were built in the 1940s and early 1950s and are largely traditional in style. “It’s a wonderful area to be in, so convenient and close to everything,” said 93-year-old Ruth Weinberg and longtime Cheviot Hills resident. Proximity is especially important for Weinberg – she drives to and from work still. With National Senior Citizens Day arriving Aug. 21, Weinberg celebrates her 72nd year as an employee of Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles’ first auction house showcasing fine estate property. “I enjoy what I do. To me, it’s a day of feeling happy,” Weinberg said. The native Angeleno joined Abell in 1943, only taking breaks to get married and have children, and in later years to care for her ill husband. But she always found her way back to the company where “it was like a birthday party every time a lot came in. I opened things that I would never see unless I went to a museum. It’s like that even today.” Ruth still works every weekly auction (held on Thursdays) and every quarterly fine art and antique sale conducted by Abell, now in its fourth generation of family operation. She also volunteers regularly at Skirball Cultural Center. A civic-minded woman, Weinberg is active in any community she enters. When she moved to Cheviot Hills 50 years ago, L.A. was in the process of building itself; the Santa Monica freeway and Westside’s first, large public park, Cheviot Hills Park, were both new, and the Santa Monica Air Line of the Pacific Electric Railway was just discontinued. Weinberg and her husband moved there for its good schools and central location. There they raised three children in a two-story home. She remembers eating at John O’Groats on Pico Blvd. Her daughter is still close with friends who lived on the block. In her spare time, she rests, as one would suspect. She keeps busy with managing her own finances and her house, with no plans of retiring anytime soon.

CBS Los Angeles: At 93 Years Old, This Los Angeles Native’s Career Is Still Going Strong

CBS Los Angeles August 7, 2015 6:16 PM COMMERCE (CBSLA.com) — At the age of 93, Los Angeles native Ruth Weinberg has no plans to retire.

“I feel that I am … how shall I say it … an asset to work in the office,” said Weinberg, who has worn many hats at Abell Auction Co. over the past 73 years.

“I did everything but auction,” she said. “I would answer the phone, do some bookkeeping and just everything.”

She has scaled back her workload, but every Thursday, Weinberg drives 35 miles from her home in Cheviot Hills to Abell’s gallery in Commerce. She also stays busy volunteering at the Skirball Center.

Weinberg took time off from work over the years to get married, have kids, and later care for her ill husband, but Abell always took her back.

“For me, I still enjoy seeing art and everything so that’s another thing that brings me here,” she said.

As a seasoned worker-bee, Weinberg does have a secret to staying in the game: “

Just being a good, conscientious worker, and paying attention,” she said. “Not goofing off.”

But as for retirement, Weinberg says, “No, not as long as they still want me and I can still come.”

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Modern Luxury Angeleno: David Webb Jewelry Auction Preview

Modern Luxury Angeleno

When: August 25, 2015 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Event Phone Number: 310.858.3073

Where: Luxe Rodeo Drive Hotel 360 N Rodeo Dr Beverly Hills CA
What:
Abell Auction Company will host a public auction preview of David Webb jewelry on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Luxe Rodeo Drive Hotel in Beverly Hills. The exhibition will feature fine estate jewelry and accessories, valued at $1 million, by David Webb, Tiffany & Co. Patek Philippe and other renowned designers. The stunning creations of Webb (1925-1975) have been worn for six decades by clients as famous as Elizabeth Taylor, Jacqueline Kennedy and Estee Lauder to Helen Mirren, Beyoncé and Jennifer Lopez, to name a few. Featured items: – Suite of David Webb diamond and turquoise jewelry – Suite of David Webb diamond and black enamel jewelry – 5.01 carat pear-shaped diamond (G, VS2) in a David Webb mount – Nautilus and skeleton watch by Patek Philippe for Tiffany & Co. – Padparadscha sapphire ring by Tiffany & Co. Complimentary refreshments will be served. RSVPs are appreciated at 310.858.3073 or lisa@abell.com.

Los Angeles Confidential : David Webb Jewelry Auction Preview

Los Angeles Confidential
August 25, 2015
David Webb Jewelry Auction Preview
Join LA-based Abell Auction Company as they present a public auction preview of jewelry by David Webb on Tuesday, August 25, 2015, at Luxe Rodeo Drive Hotel in Beverly Hills. The exhibition will include fine estate jewelry and accessories from renowned designers David Webb, Tiffany & Co. and Patek Phillippe, among others. Starts at 10 a.m. 360 N. Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills., (310) 858-3073;

Los Angeles Times: Kris Jenner or Melanie Griffith: Who’s putting this outrageous sofa up for auction?

Los Angeles Times By David A. Keeps

This Moderne tufted sofa by Italian designer Tino Cappelletti is expected to fetch $2,000 to $3,000 on July 16 at Abell Auction Co. in Los Angeles.

This Moderne tufted sofa by Italian designer Tino Cappelletti is expected to fetch $2,000 to $3,000 on July 16 at Abell Auction Co. in Los Angeles.

What is this jaw-dropping (and, let’s face it, eye-rolling) creation made from intricately carved wood, covered in couturier fabric and bedazzled with jeweled button tufting? It’s a sofa by Italian designer Tino Cappelletti, a Milanese maestro of ornamentation, whose aim is to seduce consumers with traditional furniture influenced by the world of fashion, and it is expected to be sold for $2,000 to $3,000 at Abell Auction Co. in Los Angeles on July 16. While Abell, a fourth-generation auction house founded in 1916, has long been known for handling Southern California family estates, the firm has recently ramped up its celebrity offerings, selling property belonging to Olympian Louis Zamperini (subject of the book and film “Unbroken”) and actresses Lisbeth Scott and Bess Myerson. This Thursday, the firm’s weekly auction of antiques, furniture and decorative arts from estates includes items from Kris Jenner’s Calabasas residence and Melanie Griffith and Antonio Banderas’ Hancock Park mansion. So who, you might ask, once sat upon this sofa? Here’s a clue: You’ve never seen it on “Keeping Up With the Kardashians.” The Cappelletti couch once commanded center stage in Griffith and Banderas’ Italian Revival home, which sold for just shy of $16 million last month. The couple’s home, built in 1925 by Gordon B. Kaufmann, the architect of the Hoover Dam, was furnished with grand gilded French and Italian antiques, extravagant floor lamps and dinnerware that included dishes in the Hot Flowers pattern by Versace. The auction also includes some of their simpler furniture, such as a French country table, valued at $800. By contrast, Jenner, the notorious “mom-ager” of Kim, Khloe, Kourtney, Kendall and Kylie, favored more subdued home furnishings. True, she’s selling a Louis XVI-style settee covered in a bold burgundy and violet faux bois print fabric (estimated to sell for $1,500 to $2,500), but the auction also features Persian and Navajo carpets and a Beidermeier chest and table that are each valued at $500 to $1,000. Gallery preview on July 15 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m and auction at 9 a.m. on Thursday, July 16 at Abell Auction Co., 2613 Yates Ave., Commerce. (323) 724-8102.