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L.A. Times: Auctioning off the late author Gore Vidal’s Hollywood Hills estate

Auctioning off the late author Gore Vidal’s Hollywood Hills estate

There was intense curiosity in literary and design circles alike when the Outpost Estates villa of noted author Gore Vidal hit the market last year in the Hollywood Hills, following his death in 2012.

For Vidal was not just a prolific writer but an avid collector.

On Sunday, hundreds of items from Vidal’s estate will be auctioned at Abell Auction Co. including artworks, furnishings and his personal library.

Items will range in price from about $400 to $12,000 and will include a Regency giltwood bull’s-eye mirror, a pair of Italian Baroque painted and parcel gilt torchieres, a Victorian walnut partner’s desk, a collection of Old Master paintings and drawings, as well as ceramic vessels by noted artists Harrison McIntosh and Beatrice Wood.

A preview will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. from Sept. 14 to 17 at the Abell gallery, 2613 Yates Ave., Los Angeles. The live and online sale will start at 10 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 18.  For more information, call (323) 724-8102 or visit www.abell.com, where a complete catalog will be posted.

lisa.boone@latimes.com

Beverly Hills News – Items from the Estate of Gore Vidal to be Auctioned

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Posted: Tuesday, September 6, 2016 – 9:24 PM

(CNS) – Hundreds of items from the estate of Gore Vidal, including selections from the late author’s personal library and art and antiques from his homes, will be auctioned on Sept. 18 in Los Angeles, it was announced today.

Vidal died in 2012 at age 86. Among his most famous works are “Lincoln,” “Myra Breckinridge” and “The City and the Pillar.” A member of an illustrious political family, he was the grandson of a U.S. senator and twice ran unsuccessfully for public office.

The sale will feature items ranging in value from about $400 to $10,000 from the former residences of Vidal and his partner Howard Austen — a villa called “La Rondinaia” in the resort town of Ravello, Italy, and a Mediterranean style estate in the Hollywood Hills, according to Abell Auction Co.

Both properties were featured in design magazines such as Architectural Digest and also frequented by Broadway and Hollywood writers and actors, literary figures and politicians.

Featured items include an Italian Baroque giltwood and marble console; a porphyry marble table top; a Flemish Verdure tapestry; a pair of Italian Baroque painted and parcel gilt torchieres; an Italian walnut commode and secretaire; a Victorian walnut partner’s desk; a set of four Italian painted overdoors; a collection of Old Master paintings and drawings; a Roman marble funerary urn; and Asian artifacts.

For those interested in Vidal’s personal effects and memorabilia, items include his personal library of first edition works under his name and pseudonyms; awards and recognitions, including his “Ordre des Arts et des Lettres” medallion for contributions to the arts in France; and a typed note from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Tennessee Williams.

An auction preview will be held Sept. 14-17 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Abell gallery, 2613 Yates Ave., Los Angeles. The sale begins the following day at 10 a.m. PST.

Visit www.abell.com to view a complete catalogue of the auction items.

L.A. Times: The Abell auction house has been in the business of buying, selling and bargains for 100 years

A woman bids at Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles' oldest auction house, on Feb. 4, 2016. (Barbara Davidson / Los Angeles Times)

A woman bids at Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles’ oldest auction house, on Feb. 4, 2016. (Barbara Davidson / Los Angeles Times)

 

By Susan King (contact reporter)

The Abell Auction Co. not only has sold the estates of many Hollywood stars, its auctions attracted many a legend.

“Lucille Ball used to sit in the front row at our Sunday sales,” noted Abell CEO Don Schireson, who began working at the auction house with his father in 1977. “Julie Christie used to come, Buddy Hackett. Phil Everly came in — he used to buy rugs.”

Leslie Caron also frequented the auctions. “I was so infatuated with her when she would walk in, I would, like, bump into posts,” joked Abell’s executive vice president, Howard Zellman, who has also worked at Abell’s since the 1970s.

But these days, Zellman said, celebrities rarely frequent the weekly Thursday and quarterly Sunday auctions; they’re not as involved as past generations were in picking out their decor. As Zellman points out, today “celebrities buy what the decorators want them to buy.”

The auction house was founded in 1916 by Russian immigrant Abraham N. Abell in the West Adams area near Western Boulevard. But one entire building — complete with historical records — went up in flames during the 1992 riots. The Abell family owned a building in Commerce and moved in three weeks later.

Among the items the auction house has sold over the years include:

  • Loretta Young’s Palms Spring estate featuring personal and studio stills as well as correspondence.
  • The Laughlin Park Estate of Cecil B. DeMille, which featured museum quality Italian Renaissance furniture and rare books.
    Behind-the-scenes Classic Hollywood

Take a look on set during the making of classic movies and TV shows.

  • The furnishings of Barbara Stanwyck’s estate.
  • The Steinway grand piano Gene Autry used when composing “Here Comes Santa Claus.”
  • A Yamaha grand piano owned by Gene Kelly.

“We have had a lot of estates over the years of major and minor stars,” Zellman said. “I think the major reason we get them is that we are very discreet. Not everyone wants it plastered all over that this was their linen hamper.”

On a recent hot morning, workers were loading furniture and other items that had just been purchased into cars, trucks and SUVs. And inside, the weekly Thursday auction was in full swing with a nice crowd sitting in folding chairs bidding on items while other regulars perused the sofas, pottery, dishes, jewelry, tables, art work and even a Steinway piano that were being sold that day.

“We sell about 900 to 1,000 pieces each week,” Schireson said.

Most of the buyers come to the auction house in Commerce every Thursday to buy items for resale, EBay or to use in staging homes and condos that are for sale.

“There is one guy who is here every week and buys for someone in Pennsylvania,” Schireson said.

Abell’s quarterly auction is on Sunday and highlights items from the estates of Oscar-winning actor David Niven and Emmy Award-winning Sam Simon, the writer-producer-director and co-creator of “The Simpsons.” Simon, a prominent animal rights activist, died last year at age 59. Proceeds from auction will go to the Sam Simon Charitable Giving Foundation.

“The items in the weekly auction appeal to people who come in week in and week out,” Schireson said. “We have things here that might appeal to someone in France and someone in China or someone in New York.”

Interested parties can also bid online.

“There’s a different mindset back East,” Schireson noted. “People can sell things back East we can’t sell here. We can sell midcentury modern and contemporary here, but a lot of antiques sell better in New York and Europe.”

————

Select items from the Sam Simon estate and their estimated worth:

  • Dale Chihuly blown glass chandelier — estimate: $100,000-$150,000
  • Auguste Rodin: “Le Grand Penseur” — estimate: $80,000-$100,000
  • Cecil Beaton photograph: “Untitled” — estimate: $1,000-$1,5000
  • “Revelations (from End Times)” — estimate: $3,000-$4,000

 

 

Los Angeles Business Journal: Auction Firm Still Bidding For Business

Family-run Abell looks back on lots of history in 100-year existence.

By Olga Grigoryants
Monday, February 8, 2016

After paying $100,000 for a painting, a customer at Abell Auction Co. was too cheap to pay the delivery fee and drove off toward the freeway with the valuable piece strapped to his car roof.

Luckily he and his purchase got home safely. But it still provided one of many memorable incidents experienced over the years by the family-operated business in Commerce, which will mark its 100th anniversary this month.

The auction house has become a local landmark – going and going and not gone –while winning a customer base by selling eclectic antiques and classic Hollywood memorabilia along with elegant furniture and fine art.

“Everything they have is beautiful and you can always find something irresistible,” said longtime customer Delio Moreno, 83, who has filled his West Covina home with more than a thousand items from Abell.

Founded in 1916 by Russian emigrant Abraham Abell, it is now run by the founder’s nephew, Don Schireson.

“We’re the old school of business,” Schireson said. “We know our customers by name and we treat people right.”

In the coming days, he will be treating family, friends, staff and clients to a small but heartfelt anniversary celebration.

“We’re not going to do any big dinner with huge fanfare, just a quiet breakfast together,” said Schireson, whose auction house has also had other things to celebrate recently – including selling a$1 million collection of fine jewelry.

Joining the anniversary party will be the longest serving of the company’s more than 20 employees, Ruth Weinberg. She joined in 1943 as a secretary and now, at 93, still goes into the office once a week to answer phones and talk with bidders.

Deadline Hollywood: Sam Simon’s Emmys Hitting Auction Block For Charity

The live and online auction is set for February 21, 2016 at Abell Auction Company’s Los Angeles gallery. Continue reading

Ranch & Coast: Abell Auction Company

Everyone knows estate sales are one of the surest ways to score exceptional items. That’s especially true with Los Angeles-based auctioneers Abell, who have handled covetable belongings from the likes of a former U.S. president and Hollywood celebrities.  “Abell is a treasure trove for Southern California’s top decorators, designers, collectors and small dealers,” says Abell Auction Company CEO Don Schireson. “We present our clients with a constant influx of fine and decorative art, modern and antique furnishings, fine jewelry, and 20th century design.” Abell, which has a staff that includes translators for the growing Asian market, features furniture by famous designers like Paul Evans, Paul McCobb, Charles Eames, Walter Lamb, and Finn Juhl. One recent standout item was a Philip and Kelvin LaVerne cabinet that sold for $35,000. Abell’s February auction will showcase a wall installation by iconic glass artist Dale Chihuly. (323.724.8102)

By AnnaMaria Stephens

Jewish Journal: Auction house employee is going … going … not gone

Ruth Weinberg got a secretarial job at the Abell Auction Co. in 1943. Seventy-two years later, she still goes into the office every Thursday to answer phones, work on the computer and talk to bidders from that day’s auction.

Continue reading

Life After 50: Parting With Possessions – Prudently And Professionally

Special to Life After 50
by Joe Baratta of Abell Auction Company

Continue reading

Modern Luxury Angeleno: Get to Know Our City’s Top Influencers

ANGE September 2015 p57

Beverly Hills Courier: David Webb Jewelry Auction Preview

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Westside Today: At 93, Cheviot Hills resident revels in 72 years of working

Westside Today By Mariella Rudi

Ruth Weinberg, 93, has worked at the Abell Auction Company since 1943. She continues to drive to and from work.

Ruth Weinberg, 93, has worked at the Abell Auction Company since 1943. She continues to drive to and from work.

Century City’s southside neighbor, Cheviot Hills, has had many high-profile residents roll through its affluent foothills. From Lucille Ball to Ray Bradbury to Travis Barker, the Westside neighborhood is currently enjoying a revival as one of the hottest real estate enclaves this year. But the woman who has seen the area through all its iterations isn’t a household name, and she’s worked a lifetime to stay cozy in her home in Cheviot Hills, a neighborhood of approximately 1,400 single-family homes, most of which were built in the 1940s and early 1950s and are largely traditional in style. “It’s a wonderful area to be in, so convenient and close to everything,” said 93-year-old Ruth Weinberg and longtime Cheviot Hills resident. Proximity is especially important for Weinberg – she drives to and from work still. With National Senior Citizens Day arriving Aug. 21, Weinberg celebrates her 72nd year as an employee of Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles’ first auction house showcasing fine estate property. “I enjoy what I do. To me, it’s a day of feeling happy,” Weinberg said. The native Angeleno joined Abell in 1943, only taking breaks to get married and have children, and in later years to care for her ill husband. But she always found her way back to the company where “it was like a birthday party every time a lot came in. I opened things that I would never see unless I went to a museum. It’s like that even today.” Ruth still works every weekly auction (held on Thursdays) and every quarterly fine art and antique sale conducted by Abell, now in its fourth generation of family operation. She also volunteers regularly at Skirball Cultural Center. A civic-minded woman, Weinberg is active in any community she enters. When she moved to Cheviot Hills 50 years ago, L.A. was in the process of building itself; the Santa Monica freeway and Westside’s first, large public park, Cheviot Hills Park, were both new, and the Santa Monica Air Line of the Pacific Electric Railway was just discontinued. Weinberg and her husband moved there for its good schools and central location. There they raised three children in a two-story home. She remembers eating at John O’Groats on Pico Blvd. Her daughter is still close with friends who lived on the block. In her spare time, she rests, as one would suspect. She keeps busy with managing her own finances and her house, with no plans of retiring anytime soon.

Century City News: At 93, Cheviot Hills resident revels in 72 years of working

Century City News

Ruth Weinberg, 93, has worked at the Abell Auction Company since 1943. She continues to drive to and from work.

Ruth Weinberg, 93, has worked at the Abell Auction Company since 1943. She continues to drive to and from work.

Century City’s southside neighbor, Cheviot Hills, has had many high-profile residents roll through its affluent foothills. From Lucille Ball to Ray Bradbury to Travis Barker, the Westside neighborhood is currently enjoying a revival as one of the hottest real estate enclaves this year. But the woman who has seen the area through all its iterations isn’t a household name, and she’s worked a lifetime to stay cozy in her home in Cheviot Hills, a neighborhood of approximately 1,400 single-family homes, most of which were built in the 1940s and early 1950s and are largely traditional in style. “It’s a wonderful area to be in, so convenient and close to everything,” said 93-year-old Ruth Weinberg and longtime Cheviot Hills resident. Proximity is especially important for Weinberg – she drives to and from work still. With National Senior Citizens Day arriving Aug. 21, Weinberg celebrates her 72nd year as an employee of Abell Auction Company, Los Angeles’ first auction house showcasing fine estate property. “I enjoy what I do. To me, it’s a day of feeling happy,” Weinberg said. The native Angeleno joined Abell in 1943, only taking breaks to get married and have children, and in later years to care for her ill husband. But she always found her way back to the company where “it was like a birthday party every time a lot came in. I opened things that I would never see unless I went to a museum. It’s like that even today.” Ruth still works every weekly auction (held on Thursdays) and every quarterly fine art and antique sale conducted by Abell, now in its fourth generation of family operation. She also volunteers regularly at Skirball Cultural Center. A civic-minded woman, Weinberg is active in any community she enters. When she moved to Cheviot Hills 50 years ago, L.A. was in the process of building itself; the Santa Monica freeway and Westside’s first, large public park, Cheviot Hills Park, were both new, and the Santa Monica Air Line of the Pacific Electric Railway was just discontinued. Weinberg and her husband moved there for its good schools and central location. There they raised three children in a two-story home. She remembers eating at John O’Groats on Pico Blvd. Her daughter is still close with friends who lived on the block. In her spare time, she rests, as one would suspect. She keeps busy with managing her own finances and her house, with no plans of retiring anytime soon.

CBS Los Angeles: At 93 Years Old, This Los Angeles Native’s Career Is Still Going Strong

CBS Los Angeles August 7, 2015 6:16 PM COMMERCE (CBSLA.com) — At the age of 93, Los Angeles native Ruth Weinberg has no plans to retire.

“I feel that I am … how shall I say it … an asset to work in the office,” said Weinberg, who has worn many hats at Abell Auction Co. over the past 73 years.

“I did everything but auction,” she said. “I would answer the phone, do some bookkeeping and just everything.”

She has scaled back her workload, but every Thursday, Weinberg drives 35 miles from her home in Cheviot Hills to Abell’s gallery in Commerce. She also stays busy volunteering at the Skirball Center.

Weinberg took time off from work over the years to get married, have kids, and later care for her ill husband, but Abell always took her back.

“For me, I still enjoy seeing art and everything so that’s another thing that brings me here,” she said.

As a seasoned worker-bee, Weinberg does have a secret to staying in the game: “

Just being a good, conscientious worker, and paying attention,” she said. “Not goofing off.”

But as for retirement, Weinberg says, “No, not as long as they still want me and I can still come.”

Watch the video »

Original story »

Modern Luxury Angeleno: David Webb Jewelry Auction Preview

Modern Luxury Angeleno

When: August 25, 2015 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Event Phone Number: 310.858.3073

Where: Luxe Rodeo Drive Hotel 360 N Rodeo Dr Beverly Hills CA
What:
Abell Auction Company will host a public auction preview of David Webb jewelry on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Luxe Rodeo Drive Hotel in Beverly Hills. The exhibition will feature fine estate jewelry and accessories, valued at $1 million, by David Webb, Tiffany & Co. Patek Philippe and other renowned designers. The stunning creations of Webb (1925-1975) have been worn for six decades by clients as famous as Elizabeth Taylor, Jacqueline Kennedy and Estee Lauder to Helen Mirren, Beyoncé and Jennifer Lopez, to name a few. Featured items: – Suite of David Webb diamond and turquoise jewelry – Suite of David Webb diamond and black enamel jewelry – 5.01 carat pear-shaped diamond (G, VS2) in a David Webb mount – Nautilus and skeleton watch by Patek Philippe for Tiffany & Co. – Padparadscha sapphire ring by Tiffany & Co. Complimentary refreshments will be served. RSVPs are appreciated at 310.858.3073 or lisa@abell.com.

Los Angeles Confidential : David Webb Jewelry Auction Preview

Los Angeles Confidential
August 25, 2015
David Webb Jewelry Auction Preview
Join LA-based Abell Auction Company as they present a public auction preview of jewelry by David Webb on Tuesday, August 25, 2015, at Luxe Rodeo Drive Hotel in Beverly Hills. The exhibition will include fine estate jewelry and accessories from renowned designers David Webb, Tiffany & Co. and Patek Phillippe, among others. Starts at 10 a.m. 360 N. Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills., (310) 858-3073;

Los Angeles Times: Kris Jenner or Melanie Griffith: Who’s putting this outrageous sofa up for auction?

Los Angeles Times By David A. Keeps

This Moderne tufted sofa by Italian designer Tino Cappelletti is expected to fetch $2,000 to $3,000 on July 16 at Abell Auction Co. in Los Angeles.

This Moderne tufted sofa by Italian designer Tino Cappelletti is expected to fetch $2,000 to $3,000 on July 16 at Abell Auction Co. in Los Angeles.

What is this jaw-dropping (and, let’s face it, eye-rolling) creation made from intricately carved wood, covered in couturier fabric and bedazzled with jeweled button tufting? It’s a sofa by Italian designer Tino Cappelletti, a Milanese maestro of ornamentation, whose aim is to seduce consumers with traditional furniture influenced by the world of fashion, and it is expected to be sold for $2,000 to $3,000 at Abell Auction Co. in Los Angeles on July 16. While Abell, a fourth-generation auction house founded in 1916, has long been known for handling Southern California family estates, the firm has recently ramped up its celebrity offerings, selling property belonging to Olympian Louis Zamperini (subject of the book and film “Unbroken”) and actresses Lisbeth Scott and Bess Myerson. This Thursday, the firm’s weekly auction of antiques, furniture and decorative arts from estates includes items from Kris Jenner’s Calabasas residence and Melanie Griffith and Antonio Banderas’ Hancock Park mansion. So who, you might ask, once sat upon this sofa? Here’s a clue: You’ve never seen it on “Keeping Up With the Kardashians.” The Cappelletti couch once commanded center stage in Griffith and Banderas’ Italian Revival home, which sold for just shy of $16 million last month. The couple’s home, built in 1925 by Gordon B. Kaufmann, the architect of the Hoover Dam, was furnished with grand gilded French and Italian antiques, extravagant floor lamps and dinnerware that included dishes in the Hot Flowers pattern by Versace. The auction also includes some of their simpler furniture, such as a French country table, valued at $800. By contrast, Jenner, the notorious “mom-ager” of Kim, Khloe, Kourtney, Kendall and Kylie, favored more subdued home furnishings. True, she’s selling a Louis XVI-style settee covered in a bold burgundy and violet faux bois print fabric (estimated to sell for $1,500 to $2,500), but the auction also features Persian and Navajo carpets and a Beidermeier chest and table that are each valued at $500 to $1,000. Gallery preview on July 15 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m and auction at 9 a.m. on Thursday, July 16 at Abell Auction Co., 2613 Yates Ave., Commerce. (323) 724-8102.

Ranch and Coast Magazine: Personal Belongings Are Worth More Than Memories What to know before liquidating your assets

When individuals make the decision to liquidate or downsize their assets, it can be a difficult and emotional process. They may be dealing with the sale of a home, handling a family inheritance or making a lifestyle change. While items such as furniture, antiques and jewelry often hold treasured memories, they may also hold hidden value. Estate auctions are the simplest, most transparent and most profitable way to connect sellers with the right buyers. According to the National Auctioneers Association, over a quarter-trillion dollars in goods and services are sold at auction every year in the U.S. With live and online bidding platforms, auctions attract attentive buyers who enjoy the excitement of aggressively competing to acquire something exceptional. “There are few options for liquidating the contents of a property,” said Don Schireson, CEO of Abell Auction Co., a Los Angeles-based, century-old auction house handling fine estates and collections. “A well-advertised auction with a reputable firm is the easiest and most cost-effective way to find a place for personal belongings. By selling at auction, rather than hosting a house sale, items are exposed to a larger and better informed audience, which leads to higher prices from competitive bidding.” Many people believe the terms “estate sale” and “estate auction” are interchangeable. However, there are significant differences. There are many stories about bargain hunters who purchase an item at a yard sale for a few dollars, only to discover that it is worth hundreds or thousands of dollars. While this type of mistake can easily happen at an estate sale, it is very unlikely to happen at an estate auction.

Auctions attract an international audience
At public auction, personal property is marketed to a global audience of consumers who participate in a competitive process by placing bids in-person, online or via telephone. Prices are negotiated upward, delivering fair market value or higher to the seller. For example, Abell Auction Co. offers weekly general auctions and quarterly fine art and antique sales that have drawn bids from over 40 countries. Most auction houses have set times for exhibition, allowing potential buyers to examine and preview items days prior to sale. Estate auctions and sales are both used to dispose of property owned by someone who is either moving out of a home or deceased. However, estate sales usually take place over a weekend, which limits the event to neighbors and friends rather than educated buyers. At an estate sale, the early bird gets the worm. Since consumers who arrive first get their choice of merchandise, items often sell at lower than market value. In addition, valuable items are often priced too low or misidentified by individuals who lack experience dealing with fine art, jewelry, antiques and other important furnishings.

Auctions are operated by professionals
Reputable auction companies are licensed or bonded, and follow a strict code of ethics. Professional auctioneers have years of experience and an extensive educational background in the industry. They come equipped with a full team of specialists to handle every need. “We provide tailored and complete services to those who choose to sell their personal property through Abell,” Schireson said. “Our staff includes accredited appraisers, jewelry and gem experts, and even translators to assist our international clients.” Estate sales are often operated by representatives who are eager to accept the first offer, collect a large commission and augment the sale with their own items. Many are resale dealers who bring a certain level of expertise, but have a conflict of interest in setting prices. For example, a dealer may quietly sell merchandise to friends or associates at reduced prices so they can realize their true value elsewhere.

Auctions are preferred by fiduciaries
Auction transactions are open and transparent, with accredited appraisals and a detailed accounting accepted by all courts and the Internal Revenue Service. Competitive bidding by educated buyers achieves the highest price. For these reasons, they are generally the preferred method of liquidating assets for executors, trustees and attorneys seeking to protect their clients’ best interests, as well as for family fiduciaries. While an auction house is an established place of business, estate sale operators are not regulated by any state or local entity. The sales process is closed to the both buyer and seller, and no record-keeping is required. “Unlike estate sales where strangers enter your home, Abell professionally removes all contents and delivers them to our secure auction gallery where they are carefully inventoried and catalogued,” said Schireson. “We hold our clients and their privacy in the highest regard. We also carry all insurance, so there are no worries about liability issues.”

Auctions are well-marketed
An established auction company expends great effort marketing assets through a combination of strategies, including both print and digital media. Consumers, ranging from individuals to private collectors and dealers, have the opportunity to preview items days or weeks in advance. Exposing valuable assets to a wider audience leads to higher returns. Most estate sale companies perform very limited advertising, marketing valuable assets to only a handful of neighbors and friends. At the end of the day, leftover items are usually discarded, donated to charity or sold at bulk prices without proper appraisals.

Why Sell at Auction? At auction, the marketplace sets the value.

  • Auction items are exposed to a larger and more informed audience, drawing the highest price.
  • Items are often priced incorrectly at an estate sale, selling for less than their value or not at all.

 

Auctions market and sell on an international stage.

  • Auctions attract an audience of live and international buyers.
  • Estate sales are generally attended by only a few favored dealers, friends and neighbors.

 

Auctions allow time for prospective buyers to preview and plan their strategy.

  • Buyers can preview auctions from a day to weeks in advance.
  • At estate sales, only friends of the organizer can preview.

 

Auction transactions are transparent with detailed record-keeping.

  • An auction house is a bonded business subject to all local and state laws and taxation.
  • Estate sale organizers are not regulated by any local or state entity.

 

When the auction is finished, everything is sold.

  • Auctions are an open and transparent process, with accredited appraisals and a detailed accounting accepted by all courts and the IRS.
  • Unsold estate sale items are usually donated or sold to a liquidator for a bulk price.

 

Understanding the auction process
Many times, individuals who are liquidating an estate face difficult circumstances and have limited time. It’s important to select an auction house that will professionally handle the entire contents of a home, ranging from every day household items to personal collections. “Unlike other auction companies who only accept certain items, Abell removes all belongings from a home to make life easier for our clients,” said Schireson. “By offering two types of auctions, we reach a larger audience of buyers. Our weekly sales feature the general contents of a home, while our quarterly auctions feature fine art, jewelry, antiques and important 20th century design. “ Once you’ve selected a reputable auction company, a specialist will meet with you personally to preview your estate, discuss your desires, and answer questions about the auction process and the property being sold. Estimates of higher-end items will be provided based on the current market and past auction records. When it comes to the terms of sale, consignors are required to pay the auction house a commission or sellers fee. This percentage should be significantly lower than what is charged by an estate sale company, especially on higher end items. “Individuals should select an auction house that is committed to handling your estate professionally, with the highest levels of integrity and transparency, and without charging extra hidden fees,” advised Schireson. “For example, we do not charge extra feels for photography or insurance.” After a seller’s agreement is signed, the auction company will quickly and professionally remove personal belongings from your home. This can usually be accomplished in one day. After being delivered to the auction gallery, items will be inventoried and catalogued. Soon after the auction, the seller will receive payment and an itemized settlement for estate-related purposes. Finally, a top auction house recognizes marketing as an important step in the process to connect the right buyers with the right sellers. “Our auctions are heavily promoted through professionally designed direct mail, targeted print and online advertisements, and postings on the Abell and affiliate websites,” said Schireson. “Located in the nation’s second largest market, our sales draw serious collectors from around the world.” While finding a place for the contents of an estate can seem overwhelming at first, a well-advertised auction with a professional auction house is the optimal and most cost-effective choice. The right company will handle every detail with sensitivity, privacy and professionalism, while serving the seller’s best interests. Joe Baratta is Vice President of Business Development at Abell Auction Co., Los Angeles’ first permanent auction house handling fine estates and collections. Founded in 1916, its weekly general and quarterly fine art and antiques auctions draw an international audience of live and online bidders.

Abell Auction Co. – A century of trust, experience and global relationships
Abell Auction Co. was Los Angeles’ first permanent auction house showcasing fine estates and collections, a tradition that continues today. Celebrating its 100th anniversary, the company’s weekly general auctions and quarterly fine art and antique sales attract an international audience of consumers. Abell’s weekly general auctions are held on Thursdays at 9 a.m. They feature over 1,000 unique items including fine and decorative art, modern and antique furnishings, and jewelry. Private buyers, decorators, dealers and designers experience the excitement of a live auction and acquiring something exceptional. Abell’s cataloged fine art and antique auctions are held quarterly. They feature fine art, antique furniture, fine jewelry and quality 20th century design, attracting live and international bidders who compete for record prices. Located in the nation’s second largest market, the sales draw serious collectors from around the world. Abell’s team of professionals includes accredited appraisers, jewelry and gem experts, and Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking translators to accommodate its international clientele. Now in its fourth generation and still family-operated, Abell has been entrusted with estates and consignments throughout Southern California since 1916. Its gallery is located at 2613 Yates. Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 90040.

For more information, call 310.858.3073 or visit www.abell.com.

Why Abell?

  • 100 years as Southern California’s premier auction gallery
  • Professional appraisers and specialists
  • Highly personal and tailored services
  • International audience of buyers
  • Maximum value for personal property
  • Absolute privacy and confidentiality

 

Video – KABC Eyewitness News: Louis Zamperini Auction

5/27/15
KABC Eyewitness News
Louis Zamperini Auction

Torrance CitiCable: Auction Lets Zamperini Fans Bid on Icon’s Personal Effects

Fans of Louis Zamperini will have the chance to bid on some prized possessions.

Hosted by Abell Auction Company, 25 historic items of Zamperini property will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Items include Zamperini’s University of Southern California jacket and plaque, as well as furniture from his Hollywood Hills home. Items are valued from the $200 range to the $700 range.

Zamperini’s family has donated other memorabilia to the Torrance Historical Society. Those items will be curated and displayed at the Old Torrance museum.

The auction begins at 9 a.m. Thursday with an all-day preview set for Wednesday starting at 8 a.m. For more information, visit www.Abell.com and select weekly auction.

Daily Breeze: How to own a piece of Southern California icon Louis Zamperini

louiszamperini

Southern California icon Louis Zamperini

Southern California residents this week will have what a Los Angeles auction house is describing as a “rare” opportunity to buy some of the personal effects of “Unbroken” icon, USC Olympian and Torrance hometown hero Louis Zamperini. Abell Auction Co. will sell off to the highest bidders Thursday about 25 items of furniture and other belongings once owned by Zamperini, who died last year at the age of 97.

Abell Auction Co. will sell off to the highest bidders Thursday about 25 items of furniture and other belongings once owned by Louis Zamperini, Pictured: USC jacket and plaque ($200-400).

Abell Auction Co. will sell off to the highest bidders Thursday about 25 items of furniture and other belongings once owned by Louis Zamperini, Pictured: USC jacket and plaque ($200-400).

The company’s online catalog, with descriptions of the items for sale, will go live Tuesday at Abell.com. The story of Zamperini, a high school and college track star who ran in the 1936 Olympics and was captured by the Japanese during World War II after his U.S. Air Force airplane crashed, was immortalized in a best-selling book that Angelina Jolie later made into a movie released last year. The Zamperini family is in the process of selling his $2.9 million Hollywood Hills home, said his son, Luke Zamperini. “These are couches and furniture that we just don’t have room for in our own houses,” he said. “My sister, myself and my son have picked the things we want.” As many as 25 lots will be sold, said Joe Baratta, vice president of business development for Abell Auction Co. “The draw is in the name and curiosity of someone who was obviously a major historical figure nationally and locally,” he said, adding that the items’ provenance are estimated to increase their value by 15-20 percent. “You’re looking at items that will sell for a few hundred dollars to a few thousand dollars,” he added. They include an Italian carved figure that will bring an expected $200-$300, decorative African masks and a Chinese lacquered cabinet and narrow chest that will likely bring up to $800, Baratta said. The auction begins at 9 a.m. Thursday; an all-day preview is set for Wednesday. The family-operated company, which will mark its centenary next year, specializes in estate sales. Collectors hoping to snag any Zamperini memorabilia will be disappointed. The family has donated that to the Torrance Historical Society, which will curate and display the collection at its old Torrance museum. “We’re extremely proud of our father, and we’re also proud of the city of Torrance for recognizing our dad for who he was and what he stood for,” Luke Zamperini said. There are hundreds of items, said Debbie Hays, the society’s first vice president who was a close friend of Zamperini. “We have his bomber jacket, they just found it in his closet,” she said. “We have the suitcase that the city of Torrance purchased for him when he went to the Olympics as well as the wallet the city purchased for him … that was in his back pocket when he crashed.” “We have fabulous items,” she added. “The long-term plan is to purchase new display cases for the museum, and we will rotate displays based on them.”

Audio – KNX: Estate Sales vs Auctions

 

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L.A. Riots: “It felt like I had been stabbed in the heart”

Read L.A. Weekly cover story about the 1992 Los Angeles Riots, featuring more personal stories from that turbulent time.

Read L.A. Weekly cover story about the 1992 Los Angeles Riots, featuring more personal stories from that turbulent time.

On the evening of April 29, 1992, Barry Abell got a call at home from one of his employees, telling him people with a truck were banging on the front door of the family business: the Abell Auction Company in the Adams-Normandie neighborhood. Within in no time, looters broke into the auction house that sold antique furnishings, ransacked it, and burned it down.

“It didn’t seem to be a part of reality,” recalls Abell, who’s immigrant grandfather started the business in 1916, of the Los Angeles Riots. “It felt like I had been stabbed in the heart … We were heart-broken. This was our life. This was all we’ve known. Then we had no business.”

Very active in the community with charitable work, Abell Auction was also respected among antique dealers and interior decorators across Los Angeles.

By the end of their devastating night, the Abell family lost $2 million in inventory, two buildings, memorabilia that included photographs of famous Hollywood actors and actresses who had attended auctions over the years, and an extensive research library.

The Abells tried to rebuild on the same location on West Adams Boulevard near Western Avenue, but, Barry Abell says, the city of Los Angeles made it difficult for them to quickly get the necessary permits. They sold the property and moved to the city of Commerce, where the auction house stands today.

“It’s a very business-friendly area,” says Abell, who’s president of the company. “Business is very good. I can’t complain.”

But Don Schireson, Barry’s cousin and vice-president of the auction house, thinks today’s tough economic times could cause more unrest in the future.

“The scary thing is that there’s no reason it won’t happen again,” says Schireson. “There’s a big difference between the poor and wealthy.”

In interviews with L.A. Weekly for this week’s cover story featuring “then-and-now” photographs of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, other everyday Angelenos think the same thing. What do you think?

 

View complete article here.

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